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2017 Spring Concert Schedule

Sulphur Springs Union School District
Spring Band Concert
Tuesday, May 2, 2017, 7:00pm
Golden Valley High School Theater
27051 Robert C. Lee Parkway, Santa Clarita, CA 91350
Band Students from Fair Oaks Ranch, Mitchell, Golden Oak, Leona Cox, Sulphur Springs, Pinetree
$3.00 donation at the door.

Sulphur Springs Union School District
Spring Chorus Concert
Wednesday, May 3, 2017, 7:00pm
Golden Valley High School Theater
27051 Robert C. Lee Parkway, Santa Clarita, CA 91350
Chorus students from all 9 schools!!
$3.00 donation at the door. Thank you for your donation!

Saugus Union School District
North Park, West Creek and Santa Clarita Elementary
Spring Band Concert
Tuesday, May 9th, 6:30pm
North Park School Multipurpose Room
23335 W. Sunset Hills Drive, Valencia, CA 91354

Saugus Union School District
Bridgeport and Rosedell
Spring Band Concert
Wednesday, May 10th, 6:30pm
Rosedell School Multipurpose Room
27853 Urbandale Avenue, Saugus, CA 91350, 661-294-5335

Saugus Union School District
Mountainview School
Spring Band Concert
Tuesday, May 16th, 7:00PM
Mountainview School MPR
22201 W. Cypress Place, Saugus, Ca 91390, Phone: 661-294-5325

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Sulphur Springs District Chorus Concert

Date: Tuesday, May 10th
Time: 7:00pm
Where: Golden Valley High School Theater (map)
27051 Robert C. Lee Parkway, Santa Clarita, CA 91350
Who: Chorus Students from Fair Oaks Ranch, Mitchell, Golden Oak, Leona Cox, Sulphur Springs, Mint Canyon, Valley View
Dress: Dressy Clothes
Suggestion:
Boys – black pants and white shirt
Girls – black skirt or pants and white blouse
Arrive: All students should arrive at 6:00pm
Admission: $3.00 donation at the door. Thank you for your donation! This donation helps us pay the $500.00 rental fee for the beautiful theater and stage crew at Golden Valley High School.
Class Schedule: Each school has a slightly different end date for chorus classes because of various school performance schedules (due to graduation, volunteer tea, etc.). Please check with your specific chorus teacher for the date of the last class meeting.
Programs: Listen to the Music
Better When I’m Dancing
Music is Always There
Rhythm of Life
Bonse Aba
El Vito
I Wish You Music
Of Thee I Sing, America
Yonder Come Day

***Chorus students have two preparatory rehearsals:

Combined District Chorus Rehearsals:

                        1) Wednesday, May 4, 3:30-5:00PM @ Mitchell School MPR (map)

                        2) Monday, May 9, 3:30-5:00PM @ Sulphur Springs School MPR (map)

Questions:
Roxanne Jeppesen – roxanne@cultivatingcreativeminds.com or 310-918-5780
Kathy Kinney – kaokinney@sbcglobal.net
Mary Ella Van Voorhis – mev@socal.rr.com
Kim Treat – kimtreat@mac.com
Kimberly Stevens
fsusmail@att.net

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Sulphur Springs District Band Concert

Date: Monday, May 9th
Time: 7:00pm
Where: Golden Valley High School Theater (map)
27051 Robert C. Lee Parkway, Santa Clarita, CA 91350
Who: Band Students from Fair Oaks Ranch, Mitchell, Golden Oak, Leona Cox, Sulphur Springs, Pinetree, Valley View
Dress: Dressy Clothes
Suggestion:
Boys – black pants and white shirt
Girls – black skirt or pants and white blouse
Arrive: Beginning Band arrive at 6:00pm
Advanced Band arrive at 6:30pm
Soloists arrive at 5:45PM
Admission: $3.00 donation at the door. Thank you for your donation! This donation helps us pay the $700.00 rental fee for the beautiful theater and stage crew at Golden Valley High School.
Pre-Concert Activities: In the lobby/outside amphitheater from 6:00pm-6:45pm, we will feature soloists and small ensembles.
Class Schedule: Band classes end May 6, 2016
Programs:
Beginning Band Intermediate Band
Twinkling Stars
Frere Jacques
Old MacDonald
When the Saints Go Marching In
Ode to Joy
Hard Rock Blues
James Bond Theme
Theme from Jurassic Park
Star Wars March
Linus and Lucy
25 to 6 or 4
Sing, Sing, Sing (Mitchell, Fair Oaks Ranch)

***Band Students will have One preparatory rehearsal:

Beginning Band: Monday, May 2, 3:30-5:00PM @ Golden Oak School MPR (map)

Advanced Band: Monday, May 2, 5:00-6:30PM @ Golden Oak School MPR (map)

No more classes after the concert.  Thanks for a great year and have a wonderful summer!

Questions:
Roxanne Jeppesen – roxanne@cultivatingcreativeminds.com or 310-918-5780
Scott Peters – nicevibes2000@yahoo.com
Ian Vo – ianlevo@gmail.com
Colin Burgess – bassistheplace.colin@gmail.com
John Goldman – johnbgoldman@hotmail.com
Sabrina Nickum – sabrina_n107@yahoo.com

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North Park School Spring Concert

Date: Monday, May 2nd
Time: 6:30pm
Where: North Park School Multipurpose Room
23335 W. Sunset Hills Drive, Valencia, CA 91354
Who: Chorus and Band students from North Park School
Dress: Dressy Clothes
Suggestion:
Boys – black pants and white shirt
Girls – black skirt or pants and white blouse
Arrive: All students should arrive 30 minutes early (6:00pm) for warm up.
Programs:
Beginning Band Intermediate Band
Twinkling Stars
Frere Jacques
Old MacDonald
When the Saints Go Marching In
Ode to Joy
Hard Rock Blues
James Bond Theme
Theme from Jurassic Park
Star Wars March
Linus and Lucy
25 to 6 or 4

***Special Rehearsals and Schedule:

ALL Beginning Band Students will have one combined rehearsal on Tuesday, April 26th, 3:00-4:00PM in the North Park School Library with Mr. Vo.

North Park Monday band will not meet on the day of the concert, so the students can eat and do homework.  No more classes after the concert.  Thanks for a great year and have a wonderful summer!

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Winter Concert Schedule December 2015

SSSD Band Concerts:

Golden Oak and Fair Oaks Ranch – Tues. 12/8/15, 7:00 PM @ Fair Oaks Ranch
Mitchell, Pinetree, Valley View – Thurs. 12/10/15, 7:00 PM @ Pinetree
Sulphur Springs and Leona Cox – Tues. 12/15/15, 6:30PM @ Sulphur Springs

SSSD Chorus Concerts:

Golden Oak and Fair Oaks Ranch – Wed. 12/9/15, 7:00 PM @ Golden Oak
Sulphur Springs, Leona Cox and Mint Canyon – Mon. 12/14/15 PM 6:30PM @ Leona Cox
Mitchell Chorus – Thurs. 12/17/15, 7:00PM @ Mitchell MPR

SUSD Band Concerts

North Park – Monday 12/7/15, 7:00 PM @ North Park MPR
Mountainview, West Creek – Thurs. 12/10/15, 7:00 PM @ Mountainview MPR
Bridgeport, Rosedell – Wed. 12/16/15, 6:30PM @ Bridgeport MPR

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Stop “Defending” Music Education, by Peter Greene

Today I ran across one more xeroxed handout touting the test-taking benefits of music education, defending music as a great tool for raising test scores and making students smarter. It was just one more example among many of the “keep music because it helps with other things” pieces out there.

I really wish people would stop “defending” music education like this.

I get that music programs are under intense pressure, that all across America they are sitting hunched over with one nervous eye on a hooded figure stalking the halls with a big budgetary ax. Music programs are watching administrators race by, frantically chasing test scores and ignoring music in schools. So it may seem like a natural step to go running after the testing crowd hollering, “Hey, I can help with that, too.”

Don’t. Just don’t.

First of all, it’s a tactical error. If your state gets swept up in the winds of test dumpage and suddenly tests are not driving your school, what will you say to the ax guy (because, tests or not, the ax guy is not going away any time soon)? If your big selling point for your program has been that it’s actually test prep with a horn, you’ve made yourself dependent on the future of testing. That’s a bad horse on which to bet the farm.

Second, it’s just sad. And it’s extra sad to hear it come from music teachers. Just as sad as if I started telling everyone that reading Shakespeare is a great idea only because it helps with math class.

There are so many reasons for music education. Soooooooo many. And “it helps with testing” or “makes you do better in other classes” belong near the bottom of that list. Here are just a few items that should be further up the list.

Music is universal. It’s a gabillion dollar industry, and it is omnipresent. How many hours in a row do you ever go without listening to music? Everywhere you go, everything you watch– music. Always music. We are surrounded in it, bathe in it, soak in it. Why would we not want to know more about something constantly present in our lives? Would you want to live in a world without music? Then why would you want to have a school without music?

Listening to music is profoundly human. It lets us touch and understand some of our most complicated feelings. It helps us know who we are, what we want, how to be ourselves in the world. And because we live in an age of vast musical riches from both past and present, we all have access to exactly the music that suits our personality and mood. Music makes the fingers we can use to reach into our own hearts.

Making music is even more so. With all that music can do just for us as listeners, why would we not want to unlock the secrets of expressing ourselves through it? We human beings are driven to make music as surely as we are driven to speak, to touch, to come closer to other humans. Why would we not want to give students the chance to learn how to express themselves in this manner?

Music is freakin’ magical. In 40-some years I have never gotten over it — you take some seemingly random marks on a page, you blow air through a carefully constructed tube, and what comes out the other side is a sound that can convey things that words cannot. And you just blow air through a tube. Or pull on a string. Or whack something. And while we can do a million random things with a million random objects, somehow, when we just blow some air through a tube, we create sounds that can move other human beings, can reach right into our brains and our hearts. That is freakin’ magical.

Music connects us to other humans in amazing ways. I have played in concert bands, a couple of jazz bands, and pit orchestras; I have directed church choirs and community musical theater. It is both indescribable and enormously compelling to see the many ways in which humans making music come together and connect to each other. I imagine the experience of playing team sports is something similar. You are part of something — something bigger than yourself and more than the sum of the parts. I can’t think of any other school subject that so completely fosters cooperation, collaboration, and connection between students. Students learn to help and mentor each other, support each other, lift each other up, and come together into something glorious and way, way cool.

In music, everyone’s a winner. In sports, when two teams try their hardest and give everything they’ve got, there’s just one winner. When a group of bands or choirs give their all, everybody wins. Regrettably, the growth of musical “competitions” has led to many programs that have forgotten this — but music is the opposite of a zero-sum game. The better some folks do, the better everybody does. In music, you can pursue excellence and awesomeness without having to worry that you might get beat or defeated or humiliated. Everybody can be awesome.

Music programs give back to communities forever. See that big list of community music groups I’ve worked with? I am not in a large community, but all those groups exist, and they can all exist because every single person in them came through a school music program. Your community band, your church choir, your local theater — all those groups that enrich the cultural life of your community are the result of school music programs.

Music programs can be a huge source of pride for school and community. Just like a football team, a band or choir can draw a crowd of fans who take great pride in the traditions and accomplishments of the groups. And if you’re not getting your program out in front of the public to help build that following and support, you’re messing up.

My high school band director is a hell of a guy, and he absolutely altered the trajectory of my life. When people talk about him, they often talk about all the music teachers and professional musicians that came out of his program, but I think his greatest success was all the students like me who went on to do something else, but whose lives have always been enriched by music.

Music is awesome. It’s human. It’s universal. It’s big business precisely because it is something that everybody wants.

Music does not need to make excuses for itself, as if it had no intrinsic worth. It does not have to dress itself up in test-taking robes or mathematical masks. It has deep, powerful human value, and all of us who love it should be saying so, over and over and over again.

Do not defend a music program because it’s good for other things. That’s like defending kissing because it gives you stronger lip muscles for eating soup neatly. Defend it because music is awesome in ways that no other field is awesome. Defend it because it is music, and that’s all the reason it needs. As Emerson wrote, “Beauty is its own excuse for being.” A school without music is less whole, less human, less valuable, less complete. Stand up for music as itself, and stop making excuses.

Originally posted at Curmudgucation.

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Sir Ken Robinson calls for a revolution in education

SAD PERFORMANCE statistics and the alarming number of high school dropouts and unemployed young people make it easy to feel despondent about the current state of affairs in education. Sir Ken Robinson, an internationally recognized leader in the development of education, creativity and innovation, brings much-needed inspiration to the subject. With wry humor and a sharp wit, he passionately argues not for reform, but for what he calls a revolution in education.

Robinson, who grew up in Liverpool and is professor emeritus of education at the University of Warwick in the UK, believes we need to rethink education from the ground up. To this end, he works with governments in Europe, Asia and the U.S., and with international agencies, Fortune 500 companies and cultural organizations.
In 1998, Robinson led a national commission on creativity, education and the economy for the UK government. His report, All Our Futures: Creativity, Culture and Education, was published to wide acclaim in 1999. He was a key figure in developing a strategy for creative and economic development as part of the peace process in Northern Ireland, and has also advised the Singapore government. In 2003 he received a knighthood from Queen Elizabeth II for his services to the arts.

Robinson’s ideas resonate with listeners and readers in all sectors. In 2006, he gave a speech, “Do Schools Kill Creativity?” at a conference. The speech was posted on the Internet and has subsequently been seen by an estimated 300 million people. It’s peppered with standout quotes, such as “If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original,” and “We run companies where we stigmatize mistakes.” His books The Element: How Finding Your Passion Changes Everything (Penguin/Viking, 2009) and Out of Our Minds: Learning to Be Creative (Capstone/Wiley, 2011) are popular.The Element is a New York Times best-seller and has been translated into 23 languages. He’s just written a new book, tentatively titled Finding Your Element, due out next year.

The Costco Connection recently spoke with Robinson via telephone at his house in Los Angeles to discuss creativity, intelligence and education.

The Costco Connection: In your lectures and books, you point out that, very often, young children believe they’re creative, but most adults don’t. What happens?

Ken Robinson: Several things happen. One is that as children get older, they become more socially aware and consequently more self-conscious. It’s why very young children are happy to believe that there’s a Father Christmas, and 12-yearolds aren’t. They get hit by issues of plausibility at that point. Really? He takes presents to every house in the world? In one night? Are you serious? As we age, people also tend to become more self-critical. We begin doubting ourselves and our capabilities. So part of what happens is the ordinary process of maturation and getting older.

But a big institutional reason that adults often believe they’re not creative is education. Being creative has all kinds of manifestations. It’s not just in the arts. It’s not just in music or dance or theater or writing or painting, though it is in all of those things. You can be creative at anything. You can be creative in business. You can be creative in technology and science—in anything that involves your intelligence. But being creative, which is about having original ideas, requires actual skills in the fields in which you’re working—and an openness of mind, a willingness to explore, a confidence in your imagination, a willingness to try things out and make mistakes and try again.
What happens in education, too often and increasingly, I’m sorry to say, is that a dampening culture of standardization gets brought in. The curriculum tends to become very narrow. There are all kinds of opportunities that we could make available to kids that we don’t. So, if you happen to be a young Matt Groening [creator of The Simpsons] or Mick Fleetwood [drummer of the rock group Fleetwood Mac], and you happen to be interested in art or music, and the curriculum excludes these subjects, you may never discover that these are things that you could be good at.
Conformity and standardization and sitting still and doing multiple-choice questions and being tested at the end—these features of education are inimical to the kind of original thinking and confident imaginations that underpin real innovation. I think as we get older our expectations shift and education tends to suppress some of the basic aptitudes and attitudes that underpin real creative work. The result is that adults end up thinking they’re not very creative.

CC: So, if the current education system hampers creativity, which you’ve just explained is key to innovation in any field, then what needs to change?

KR: The current systems of education were developed in the 19th century to meet the needs of the Industrial Revolution, and it shows itself in two ways. One is in the organizational culture of education, which for the most part is very regimented. It’s organized a bit like an assembly line. Children are divided into age groups, for example, as if the most important thing they have in common is their date of manufacture. Why? We don’t do that in families or in the general community. It’s done in schools for reasons of organizational efficiency, not for effective education.

We divide each day up into 40-minute periods, for the same reason. And then the day is divided into separate subjects. We have standardized testing at the end of it. It’s very much like an industrial process, and it’s not an accident, because our systems of mass education were developed in the 19th century to meet the needs of the new industrial economies and they were designed for efficiency, like other systems of mass production.
Second, our education systems are overlaid with a particular intellectual culture, which is promoted by the needs of the universities. This culture gives a premium to certain types of academic work and tends to demean practical and vocational work as second-class options. But the fact is that aptitude takes many different forms, and we have a view of it in education that is far too narrow and wasteful. In all of these ways, the dominant culture of education is oriented toward the last century, not the present one.
The challenges our children face now are quite different from the ones that people faced in the 19th century. The world is being transformed by digital technology. We have surging population growth. There are more and more demands on natural resources. The world’s becoming more interconnected, more complicated. The life cycles of jobs and occupations are getting shorter as innovation increases. If we’re being honest and serious about how we educate our kids, we need to look at the real lives that they’re leading now—the lives they’d like to lead. That calls for a different sort of education to the one that most of us came through. Employers everywhere say, for example, that they need people who are creative, who can work in teams, who can collaborate and innovate. Our current systems of education do almost exactly the opposite.

CC: How well has the education system served those who are now in the workforce?

KR: When I was working on The Element, many of the people I spoke with didn’t feel that they fitted in with the kind of education they were having. That was true of Matt Groening. He spent most of his time doodling and drawing and doing cartoons all over his books. He didn’t have a career plan in mind; it was just something he did compulsively. Mick Fleetwood said that he was always tapping and beating out rhythms on cushions, and again, he said it wasn’t a very clear signal that there was anything tremendously important going on; it was just something he compulsively did.

A lot of people I know went through education feeling unconnected to it. And that’s really what The Element tries to illustrate. But this isn’t just about the arts. My arguments apply to science, technology and all other areas of education too. The point is that there should not be a single measure of ability or interest. Human beings have a huge range of talents and interests, and we need to take that into account in education.

CC: Can you define what you mean by finding one’s element for readers who haven’t read your book The Element?

KR: The element is finding that point where talent meets passion. Both are important. If you’re in your element, you’re doing something for which you have a natural aptitude. You get it. I’m not suggesting that you have to be the best in the world or the best in history, but you get it and you have a natural feel for it.

I know people for whom that’s true in every type of work. Aptitude takes many different forms. But being good at something is only part of this. To be in your element, you really have to love what you’re doing. If you love something that you’re good at you never “work” again. And you can tell. If you love something, time changes when you’re doing it. An hour feels like five minutes. But if you’re doing something that you don’t care for or doesn’t resonate with your own particular energy, then five minutes feels like an hour.
My wife, Therese, is a great example of what I’m talking about. She recently wrote a novel,India’s Summer. It actually came out of work she did with me on The Element. She was doing some of the early interviews for the book and it reignited her own passion for writing and she set out to write this novel.

Untold hours flew by when she was writing because she was so immersed in the story and the characters and the whole process of writing and creating an imagined world for them. The book’s now published and she’s working on the sequel and loves writing every day. For her it’s often the best part of the day.

CC: What about people who have a huge passion for something but little or no aptitude for it?

KR: It’s hard to overestimate the importance of passion. There are people in all kinds of fields who would consider themselves—rightly or wrongly—to be only modestly talented in a particular area, but they’ve gone on to do well in it, or thoroughly enjoy it, because they have such a strong passion for it. Equally, I know people who might be highly gifted in a particular activity who have no real interest in it. I think passion is the great driving force here, and passion is the right word for it because it is about loving something. If you’re attracted to something, then you get energized by doing it.

CC: Do you see examples of schools that are doing a good job of teaching children the skills they’ll need to succeed in today’s world?

KR: I do, and in my book Out of Our Minds: Learning to Be Creative, I describe in detail the kinds of changes I believe we have to make and give examples of how they work.
The fact is that there are great schools everywhere, but there is no single model or type of school that should be adopted everywhere. This is one of the ways in which we have to think differently about education. Schools need to be customized to the needs of the students who go to them and to the nature of the communities that they are serving. Although there’s no single model, there are some common principles and approaches that I believe all schools should adopt.

To begin with, education has to be personalized to every student. If anyone reading this has two or more children, I’ll bet you that they are completely different from each other. If you’re a parent, you’re never confused by which of your children you’re talking to. The reason is that we’re all unique. We all have our own talents, passions, motivations and interests.

Education has to address us all as individuals. Sometimes I hear people say that we can’t afford to create personalized education for everyone. The fact is that we can’t afford not to. In the United States, something like 30 percent of students don’t finish high school. It’s a much higher figure in some parts of the country. That’s a massive waste of talent and ability and a huge drain on the national economy.

Many kids drop out because they don’t see the point in school and don’t feel it’s about them at all. The best way to improve education is to reengage them personally.

CC: How do you go about addressing students as individuals in education?

KR: What does it mean to personalize education? It means, first, that schools have to have a broad curriculum that allows all students to discover their real strengths and the areas in which they flourish.
Second, teaching has to take account of how different children actually learn. Not all kids learn best sitting still for hours absorbing verbal information. Some children respond best to visual information; some need to move and express themselves physically.
“If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original.”
Third, the schedule of the school needs to be more flexible to allow learning across age groups and between disciplines.
And fourth, assessment has to be more descriptive of what students have done and rely less on single numbers and grades, which give very little information and tend to turn the whole process of education into a kind of standardized obstacle course.
The good news is that we can do all of these things now and some of the most successful schools in the country are doing them.

CC: How are the successful schools you see doing these things?

KR: New digital technologies make it perfectly possible to personalize the curriculum and the schedule, and the tools and applications that are now available make it easier than ever to change the nature of teaching and learning. I don’t mean that technology is the answer to everything. I argue in all my talks and books that it is not. But it is a game changer for why we’re educating our children and for how we can do it.

The big change, I believe, has to be from seeing education as a mechanical or industrial process to seeing it much more as a human and organic one. Gardeners know that they can’t make plants grow. Plants grow themselves. Gardeners provide the right conditions for that to happen. Good gardeners understand those conditions. Running a school or teaching a class or raising a family is much more like gardening than [like] engineering. It’s about providing the best conditions for growth and development. And if we get that right we’ll see an abundant harvest of talent, commitment, imagination and creativity in all of our children and in all of our schools.

There have always been schools that have been practicing the sorts of principles I’ve been talking about. There aren’t enough of them yet, but encouraging schools to personalize and customize education to real children is where the revolution [in education] will come from. I’m not waiting for some shaft of enlightenment to emerge from our government buildings. Real change almost always happens from the ground up. Part of my mission is to encourage more and more people to make changes in the work they do. If enough people do it, that’s a movement. As Gandhi once said, we should all aim to be the change we want to see in the world.

member profile

Name: Sir Ken Robinson
Occupation: Author, educator
Website: http://sirkenrobinson.com
City of residence: Los Angeles
Contact: info@sirkenrobinson.com

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